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Keshet - Signs of Inherent Goodness

During yesterday’s 10-Minute Tune Up, Reb Steve, asked us to reflect on the “signs” in our lives that makes us feel everything is all right--a relevant question for a time such as this, and of course inspired by this week’s Parasha, Noah. 


We learn from Torah that the keshet, or rainbow, is a reminder from God. It is actually a sign of the covenant between God and humanity. Its presence reminds us that never again will humanity be destroyed in a manner such as the biblical flood. 


While this ancient text may seem far away and far fetched, it does come to teach us something important. All around us there are signs to remind us of the inherent goodness and kindness in the world. This is not to say we don’t encounter challenges, evil acts, or suffer tragedy. Of course we do. Rather, in the midst of those very challenges, there are signs that remind us of the fuel that energizes all of creation: Love. 


Look around. You’ll see them. Rebbe Nachman of Breslov riffs on this idea. He teaches that God is present inside the very obstacles we encounter. Sometimes we just need to shift the perspective, either zooming in or zooming out.  


I encourage us to reflect on the same question Reb Steve posed. What in your life serves as a sign, a reminder, that all will be okay? Is it something small and incredibly personal? Is it grand and all encompassing? Pay attention to the signs. Enter the obstacle with the idea that God, love, goodness exist there too.




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